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No one should live their life in fear, simply because of the color of their skin.

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Jonathan Smoke provides insights on potential vehicle losses

Carolina Dealers Face Florence Losses

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Article Highlights

  1. Lower vehicle density will spare Hurricane Florence-affected areas from tallying total losses approaching those seen in Texas and Florida during last year’s hurricane season, predicted Jonathan Smoke, chief economist for Cox Automotive.
  2. In a statement released at noon ET yesterday, Smoke acknowledged the “hard reality” of significant flooding and property loss faced by millions of residents from the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia, many of whom are now “thankfully” under mandatory evacuation. However, Smoke said he believed Florence’s impact on the automotive industry will be “manageable,” at least when compared with the devastation sown by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma in 2017.
  3. “With the evacuation and other preparations taking place now, the impact should be less than what we saw in Houston last year,” he said. “North Carolina could lose 20,000 to 40,000 vehicles if Florence maintains its current path and remains a Category 4 or 5 hurricane given the likely damage from wind and flooding.”

Lower vehicle density will spare Hurricane Florence-affected areas from tallying total losses approaching those seen in Texas and Florida during last year’s hurricane season, predicted Jonathan Smoke, chief economist for Cox Automotive.

In a statement released at noon ET yesterday, Smoke acknowledged the “hard reality” of significant flooding and property loss faced by millions of residents from the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia, many of whom are now “thankfully” under mandatory evacuation. However, Smoke said he believed Florence’s impact on the automotive industry will be “manageable,” at least when compared with the devastation sown by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma in 2017.

“Vehicle density in current path, thankfully, is about half that of Houston. The broad possible impact path of Hurricane Florence from Savannah, Ga., to Norfolk, Va., encompasses a population of 10.2 million people and 3.9 million households. Thankfully, this is not as densely populated as some coastal regions,” Smoke said. “The broad area has a population density of 182 people per square mile, which is less than half that of the Houston DMA or the state of Florida, which were impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma last year.”

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