icon-branding Inventory Icon icon-mail-hovericon-mail Marketing Icon icon-operationsicon-phone-hovericon-phone Product Training Icon Sales Icon Service Icon icon-social-fb-hovericon-social-fbicon-social-google-hovericon-social-googleicon-social-linkedin-hovericon-social-linkedinicon-social-rss-hovericon-social-rss icon-social-twitter icon-social-twitter-hovericon-social-twittericon-social-youtube-hovericon-social-youtube

COVID-19 BUSINESS UPDATES

View Details x

It didn’t take long for Pritam Singh to learn a key lesson

Robotaxis’ vomit problem: there’s no one to clean up the mess

Share

Facebook Share Twitter Tweet Linkedin Share Email Email

It didn’t take long for Pritam Singh to learn a key lesson about working for Lyft. People are disgusting. They have a nasty habit of throwing up in moving vehicles.

Rideshare drivers are acutely aware that customers tend to do that, along with slightly less annoying things like wiping hamburger-greasy fingers on armrests and turning floor mats into swamps of slush. Singh, who ferries passengers for Lyft Inc. in Manhattan several evenings a week, drops about $200 a month cleaning — really, sometimes it feels like sanitizing — his Toyota Camry.

For General Motors, Uber and others mulling a foray into robotaxis, the bill could be in the tens of millions of dollars annually. When you add things like insurance, inventory storage and the steadily shrinking value of beat-up cars? Billions.

Read more›

Sign up here to receive bi-weekly updates on news and trends dominating the automotive industry.